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What was the impact of the November 4, 2014 vote on Ballot Question 2B?

Rumors:
We already voted on the plan for 38th Avenue in 2014 and we said no to the plan.
We voted to put the lanes back the way they were on 38th Avenue.

Fact:
On Tuesday, November 4, 2014, Wheat Ridge residents voted on Ballot Question 2B. The ballot language asked voters whether a new street width should be designated for portions of 38th Avenue, based on the recommendations of the 38th Avenue Corridor Plan.

Voters rejected the measure. Therefore, the legal impact of the November 4, 2014 vote on Ballot Question 2B was that the width of 38th Avenue would remain as is. The practical impact of the vote was that the conceptual streetscape design that had been developed based on a narrower street would have to be redeveloped, based on the existing and current width of 38th Avenue. Currently, the Cre8 Your 38 process is engaging the Wheat Ridge Community to redevelop the streetscape design.

Following are additional details, explanations and links to related documents regarding Ballot Question 2B, the history of how the measure went to the voters and its impact.

Ballot Question 2B, asking voters if a street width designation should be made for portions of 38th Avenue: SHALL A STREET WIDTH FOR 38TH AVENUE BETWEEN UPHAM STREET AND MARSHALL STREET BE ESTABLISHED BY CITY COUNCIL IN ORDER TO IMPLEMENT THE VISION OF THE 38TH AVENUE CORRIDOR PLAN TO REVITALIZE THE 38TH AVENUE CORRIDOR BETWEEN UPHAM STREET AND MARSHALL STREET INTO A MAIN STREET BUSINESS DISTRICT TO INCLUDE WIDER PEDESTRIAN SIDEWALKS, AMENITY ZONES WITH LANDSCAPING AND SEATING AREAS, ON-STREET PARKING, PUBLIC ART, AND COMMUNITY GATHERING PLACES, SUCH THAT THE STREET WIDTH FOR 38TH AVENUE BE ESTABLISHED AT 47 FEET FROM UPHAM STREET TO HIGH COURT, 41 FEET FROM HIGH COURT TO 230 FEET EAST OF HIGH COURT, AND 35 FEET FROM 230 FEET EAST OF HIGH COURT TO MARSHALL STREET?

Explanation of what the ballot question did not ask voters to decide:
The ballot language did not ask voters to determine the number of vehicle lanes on 38th Avenue;

The ballot language did not ask voters to approve or disapprove of the 38th Avenue Corridor Plan; 

The ballot language did not ask voters to direct the City to restripe 38th Avenue; and,

The ballot language did not prohibit the City from developing a streetscape design for public improvements along 38th Avenue.

History of the ballot question: 
On June 16, 2014, Wheat Ridge City Council reviewed plans for public improvements to 38th Avenue. Those plans included a change in the width of portions of 38th Avenue between Upham Street and Marshall Street. 

On July 14, 2014, Wheat Ridge City Council approved a resolution that would set a street width designation for 38th Avenue, effectively narrowing portions of the street from between 64 feet and 44 feet curb-to-curb to between 47 feet and 35 feet, depending on the section of the road. This resolution was dependent on the approval of Wheat Ridge voters.

On August 25, 2014, Wheat Ridge City Council adopted an ordinance to place Ballot Question 2B on the November 4, 2014 general election ballot

Related: A new community engagement process is underway to help develop the streetscape design of 38th Avenue. Cre8 Your 38 is an interactive process that will take place during the course of three community meetings in which participants will have the opportunity to create models of what 38th Avenue could look like and then identify the preferred options. Find out more about the process on Facebook or the City’s website, and watch a video about how the meetings will work.

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